Public urged to have say on A96 dualling

Could the end finally be in sight for the notorious traffic bottleneck at Inveramsay Bridge on the A96 Aberdeen to Inverness road?
Could the end finally be in sight for the notorious traffic bottleneck at Inveramsay Bridge on the A96 Aberdeen to Inverness road?

A series of public consultations will be held next month among communities along the A96 corridor, allowing people from Aberdeen to Inverness the chance to have their say on the dualling of the busy road.

In May, Scottish Government Transport Minister Keith Brown outlined the package of design and development work to be carried out in the coming years, with plans to completely dual the A96 by 2030.

Preliminary engineering and strategic environmental assessment work is already underway, and Transport Scotland are taking forward initial design and development work on behalf of the Scottish Government.

Ministers have stressed that stakeholder engagement forms a key part of this process and is vital in informing the planning, design, procurement and construction phases.

Nine exhibition events will take place from November 12 to 29, giving people the opportunity to express their views on the massive project.

Among the venues is the Acorn Centre in Inverurie, which will host an exhibition on November 28 between noon and 7pm.

North-east ans are urging the public to attend the sessions.

Aberdeenshire East MSP Alex Salmond said: “I’m delighted to welcome this further step towards completing the dualling of the A96 from Aberdeen to Inverness.

“It is important that local communities are fully aware of proposals to develop the route from an early stage, and I’d encourage any interested parties from my constituency to visit the Acorn Centre in Inverurie on 28th November to learn more about the planning and design process.

“Dualling the A96 is one of the biggest transport infrastructure projects underway in Scotland and, in conjunction with the AWPR and plans for the A9, it will provide a great boost to the communities and local economies in the north and north-east.”