Premnay turbine project rejected

A PROPOSED wind turbine at Premnay that was subject to a site visit by members of the Garioch Area Committee, had planning permission refused on Tuesday (January 31).

The application for a 20.6 metre mast by Mr D Wyllie, Brackla House, Premnay, mast generated 16 letters of representation from 13 households.

They raised concerns including the impact on the amenity of the area, the impact on the historic environment, the lack of screening, and issues over noise, shadow flicker and ice throw.

The application had been recommended for approval by council planners.

Area Planning Officer Darren Ross told the committee that the three main issues over the application were impact on neighbouring properties, the impact on the landscape and the ecological impact. He informed them that the planning service had been contacted regarding a badger sett in the area and that an additional survey would have to be carried out prior to any work going ahead.

The committee agreed to hear from Mr Torrance on behalf of objectors. Mr Torrance told the committee that the majority feeling in the local community was that the application should be rejected and that there had been a “lack of consultation“. He claimed some of the submitted documentation was misleading and that “the highest standards had not been addressed”. He added that, in his opinion, shadow flicker from the turbine would be an issue, and that claims that trees would hide the turbine were an “exaggeration”. he also highlighted the issue regarding the badger sett.

Mr Wylie, the applicant, also addressed the committee noting that the turbine would help diversification on his mixed use hill farm, and that it was Scottish Government and Aberdeenshire Council policy to encourage renewable energy. He said he had looked at various renewable energy options and wind development was the most appropriate. He also pointed out that he had consulted Historic Scotland who were happy that nearby trees would screen the turbine from view from the neighbouring stone circle.

He said that he didn’t think that the lack of consultation with neighbouring houses was an issue, he also said he had carried out consultation with regards to the badgers and that an independent survey had not found an active sett. The nearest sett was located in a field that had been continually cultivated for 10 years.