Survey shows Kintore broadband divide

Numerous broadband problems have been identified in a Kintore survey
Numerous broadband problems have been identified in a Kintore survey

A survey conducted in Kintore at the end of October by community website ww.kintore.org.uk has revealed that there is widespread dissatisfaction with broadband services in the town.

While some of those who are able to get fibre broadband enjoy speeds over 65MB, a significant number on conventional wired broadband report their service appears to be deteriorating.

Almost two thirds (65 percent) of those who responded complained of disconnections affecting their broadband service, with 38 per cent saying these outages are “quite regular” or “very regular”.

On broadband speeds, 40 per cent say they are dissatisfied. Just over a quarter reported that the speeds they get were 1MB or less and 10 per cent complained of broadband speeds less than 500k.

Three quarters of those responding are on traditional wired broadband, with only 17 per cent having “superfast” fibre broadband. Satellite accounts for 4 per cent of the total, with one subscriber saying that they switched to satellite in response to poor speeds and disconnections on conventional broadband. Almost 70 per cent of respondents are BT Broadband customers.

Commenting on the survey, Ken McEwen of community website Kintore.org.uk, said, “We are seeing something of a digital divide in Kintore. While those who are able to get fibre broadband are seeing higher broadband speeds, but those of us who are stuck on wired broadband are convinced that our service is getting worse.

“A substantial number of the responses from the survey refer to slow speeds and data throughput failures affecting broadband services at peak times. This must raise questions about the capacity of the exchange in Kintore. Given that considerable amounts of public money are being invested it would be concerning if this investment is coinciding with a deterioration in the wired broadband network that still supplies the majority of connections in towns.”