Installation of PAD at Bennachie centre

Pictured (left to right) with the PAD are Ann Baillie (Trustee), Jan Lythgoe, Malcolm White of Aberdeenshire Council, Pat Sturrock (chair of the Bennachie Centre Trust) and Jon Nicol (Trustee).
Pictured (left to right) with the PAD are Ann Baillie (Trustee), Jan Lythgoe, Malcolm White of Aberdeenshire Council, Pat Sturrock (chair of the Bennachie Centre Trust) and Jon Nicol (Trustee).

The Bennachie Centre Trust has welcomed the installation of a Public Access Defibrillator (PAD) at the Bennachie Visitor Centre.

The Bennachie Heart Appeal was launched in Spring this year with the aim of raising £3000 to purchase and install a PAD for the benefit of visitors to Bennachie and with wider local community.

It also hoped to raise awareness of how to use this life-saving piece of equipment.

Bennachie Visitor Centre warden, Jan Lythgoe, said: “Since the launch, visitors to the Bennachie Visitor Centre have supported the appeal in lots of different ways.

“To everyone who bought a T-shirt, badge or car sticker, made a donation or attending a fundraising activity, we say thank you.

“With the support of a British Heart Foundation grant, the Bennachie Visitor Centre now also has a number of ‘Call, Push, Rescue’ training kids and it will be planning a series of informal practise sessions for the public.”

Fundraising will continue in order for the group to purchase replacement/additional equipment.

A Public Access Defibrillator can be used by members of the public and/or staff in the event of a sudden cardiac arrest.

It gives a high energy electric shock to the heart of someone who is in cardiac arrest and plays an essential role in trying to save the life of someone who is in cardiac arrest.

You don’t need to be trained to use a defibrillator - anyone can use it.

There are clear instructions on how to attach defibrillator pads.

It then assesses the hearty rhythm and will only instruct you to deliver a shock if it’s needed. You cannot deliver a shock accidentally.

In a recent survey three-quarters of people said they wouldn’t feel confident enough to act if they saw someone having a cardiac arrest.