Traffic safety measures to be considered for Newburgh

Aberdeenshire Council says the footway build-out to reduce the width of Main Street to 6m would act as an uncontrolled pedestrian crossing point
Aberdeenshire Council says the footway build-out to reduce the width of Main Street to 6m would act as an uncontrolled pedestrian crossing point

Councillors are expected to approve proposed new traffic management measures for Newburgh next week.

Aberdeenshire Council’s Formartine Area Committee, which meets on Tuesday, will be asked to formalise parking spaces and the installation of a footway build-out on the village’s Main Street.

If agreed, the council will begin the statutory procedure for the making of the Aberdeenshire Council (Newburgh Traffic Management) Order.

Back in February the committee was petitioned by the Residents and Friends of Newburgh for a 20mph speed limit on Main Street in a bid to improve safety.

However, an assessment by the council concluded that promotion of a 20mph limit would have fallen outwith current policy.

Recent surveys also revealed that traffic speeds remain well below the current policy intervention level of 35mph.

It did, however, prompt officers to suggest formalising parking spaces to act as a traffic management measure along with the introduction of ‘At Any Time’ no waiting restrictions to improve visibility and avoid long stretches of parked cars.

The footway build-out reducing the road width to 6m would act as an uncontrolled pedestrian crossing point on Main Street outside the village hall and improve visibility for pedestrians at the crossing point.

A recent community consultation found that residents were largely supportive, with people generally understanding what the council is trying to achieve.

However, there were some negative comments regarding the area outside the shop with a lack of available parking being a concern.

Foveran Community Council strongly objects to the waiting restriction proposals on Main Street and remains of the view that a 20mph speed limit should be promoted.

In response to individual objections about the impact on residents who park in the area, four 45-minute time-limited spaces have been allocated.

The cost of the footway build-out and implementation of the traffic order is estimated at £5,000 which will be accommodated within the 2019-2020 Capital Budget as a cycling and walking initiative.

In a report to committee, Infrastructure Services director Stephen Archer says: “Subject to the approval of this committee, it is proposed to undertake a four-week statutory consultation with interested parties such as the emergency services, Police Scotland, community councils, the Road Haulage Association and others.

“This would be followed by a 21-day formal public consultation with site notices erected at the affected locations and giving anyone who wishes to object to the making of the order the opportunity to do so.”