Two year cattle ban for Methlick man

Scottish Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals badge
Scottish Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals badge

A man who caused unnecessary suffering to three cattle by failing to seek routine veterinary treatment for the overgrowth of their horns has been given a two year ban on keeping or owning cattle.

Marshall Hay, 78, of Castlehill, Methlick was sentenced at Aberdeen Sheriff Court on Friday, February 22.

Mr Hay was brought to court following a Scottish SPCA investigation.

He pled guilty to two charges of causing unnecessary suffering under section 19 of the Animal Health & Welfare (Scotland) Act 2006 to a black and white male steer, and consecutively two red male cattle.

Scottish SPCA senior inspector Alison Simpson said: “This charge was dealt as Hay failed to seek standard veterinary treatment for his cattle, predominantly three males.

“The first of the three was a black and white castrated male, who, upon veterinary examination was discovered to have an ingrown right horn, protruding four inches into the sinus, creating a seven centimetre wide hole in his head. After removing the ingrown horn, dressing the wound and injecting antibiotics it was noticed he had a broken right tibia. The decision was immediately made to euthanise the cow to prevent further suffering.

“The second of the cattle in question, a red castrated male, was found to have both horns growing into the side of his head. The horn on the right hand side of his head was embedded into the soft tissue. The ingrown horn on the right side had punctured the skin five centimetres. The horn on the left hand side was also overgrown although not to such a bad extent.

“The last was also a red coloured castrated male. His right horn had also grown into his head and the left side round the front of his eye. The horn on the right hand side was embedded into the soft tissue and once removed, was also found to be piercing five centimetres into his head. The horn on the left hand side was obscuring the animal’s eye and starting to penetrate the skin.

“The decision was made to put both red males to sleep to prevent further suffering.

“We are happy that Hay pled guilty and this sentence handed down.

“Prosecution is always a last resort for the Scottish SPCA and every effort was made to work with Hay prior to this, however the disregard for his animal’s welfare led us to having no choice.

“Hay has two months before the ban is enforced.”